Windows 8: Bye or Buy?

Many people do not like change. It is within human nature. This is exactly what Windows 8 is: Change. When first experiencing the Windows 8 environment people are taken aback at all the changes and say that they do not like the operating system because of it. They are quick to categorize this new piece of technology and apply stereotypes to the machinery such as, “This is different. Therefore this is bad.” This is seen because there is such a drastic change between the Windows 7 and Windows 8 environment. Microsoft like to view themselves as being “easily configurable” and being better and better at it by the improvements in each operating system release [3].

It is important to see both sides of the story in order to determine if one wants to purchase Windows 8 or not. In order to do that, I have presented some of the changes seen between the old windows environment and the new Windows 8:

The start button is gone. It has been replaced by the “Charms bar.” In here, the user can easily access devices and settings as well as the search and share buttons. The charms bar also has a start screen button in order for the user to access the live tiles. The start menu which was seen in Windows 7 and below has been replaced by the start screen [1].

The Windows Defender has been brought back and is new and improved. It handles viruses and spyware, and it is built into the operating system [2].

Many people utilize the desktop gadgets on Windows Vista and Windows 7. It helps monitor the CPU usage, access the calendar, and other useful or simply entertaining things as well. This feature has been removed entirely from the Windows 8 operating system.

Windows 7 added a feature which enables users to snap windows side by side. Windows 8 takes it to a new level and has a snapped view, fill view, and full view. This is a whole new interface for multitasking.

Personally, I always loved the Windows Key + Tab feature on previous windows systems in which a 3D flip through all of the open processes was enabled. This feature has also changed on the Windows 8 system. Now, the same commands bring up the “top-level processes which is only used for Windows Store apps” [1].

Many people love to play the default games such as freecell and chess that come with the older operating systems. However, these games were removed. They now can be downloaded in the windows 8 store. The user must download the application in order to play the games. [1]

Password protection is different and unique. Instead of having just a plain text password, the user now has the option to choose a picture they would like to lock their screen with and then use gestures on the picture to unlock the screen.

It is hard enough for most people to adapt to change. My grandmother sat in front of a Windows 8 machine and had no idea what to do. She was so used to her start menu and saved program options that the new environment became a great struggle for her.

Windows 8 is geared towards improvement and for the future. Now that you have seen both sides of the issue, you can decide for yourself if you want to give into believing that Microsoft is terrible because of all of its changes. You can decide if you do not want use Windows 8 just because it is different. Just be sure not to make up your mind completely until you have used the software for a little while. Then you can make your true decision and decide for yourself your standpoint on the Windows 8 environment.

[1] http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_features_removed_in_Windows_8
[2] http://www.techradar.com/us/news/software/operating-systems/10-best-hidden-features-in-windows-8-1117304

[3] http://it.toolbox.com/blogs/locutus/linux-and-windows-stereotypes-35856

About Katrina Fishman

Meticulous, determined, and motivated with a passion for software development. Interested in Mobile Application Development and Software Development. Specialties include the programming languages C / C++ / Java. Mobile platform development is Android/Windows8. Proficient in Eclipse, Microsoft Visual Studio IDE's.